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Medium Dawn Felagund of the Fountain

Snowflake Challenge, Day 2: A Life-Changing Book

The (Cyber) Bag of Weasels

bread and puppet




"About as much fun as a bag of weasels"...when I first saw this Irish adage, it made me think of the life of a writer: sometimes perilous, sometimes painful, certainly interesting. My paper journal has always been called "The Bag of Weasels." This is the Bag of Weasels' online home.

Snowflake Challenge, Day 2: A Life-Changing Book

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feanorians
Here is today's prompt for the Snowflake Challenge:

In your own space, share a book/song/movie/tv show/fanwork/etc that changed your life. Something that impacted on your consciousness in a way that left its mark on your soul. Leave a comment in this post saying you did it. Include a link to your post if you feel comfortable doing so.


I would, of course, choose The Silmarillion. It is not my favorite book, but it is absolutely the book that has had the most outsized influence on my life.

 photo silmarillion_zpspycpzqog.jpg

I came to The Silmarillion as a newly minted Tolkien fan, having gotten hooked by the LotR movies, an interest that was only galvanized by reading Lord of the Rings and The Hobbit. My first copy of the Silm was the one to the right, with the weird cover that has Fëanor with graceful hands, flowing leopard-print scarves, and what appears to be an owl eating his head. The back of this particular edition, which is of course sitting right on my desk in front of me because I need to look something up in it at least weekly, reads:

The Silmarillion is Tolkien's first book and his last. Long preceding in its origins The Lord of the Rings [sic], it is the story of the First Age of Tolkien's world, the ancient drama to which characters in The Lord of the Rings [sic] look back, and in which some of them, such as Elrond and Galadriel, took part.


Now to a new fan such as myself, ravenous for more of LotR, this sounded promising! Elrond and Galadriel! I knew them!! I had no idea, of course, that the book wasn't about Elrond and Galadriel, who more or less have walk-on roles in The Silmarillion, but about a cast of dozens, everyone's name of which seems to begin with Fin-. I was also very new to the fantasy genre and really had no idea how to read a book like The Silmarillion. I went into it with my brain relaxed, expecting a frivolous sword-and-sorcery worthy of a beach read, instead of honing on every detail and storing away every name. I failed miserably in my first reading of it. I was about halfway through when Fëanor was mentioned, I looked him up in the Index of Names (the very fact that there is an Index of Names in the book should have been my first clue, no?), and realized he was someone important whom I should have remembered.

It was only because I was stubborn and embarrassed by my failure that I decided to give it another go, this time knowing better what I was getting into and more prepared to read the book as it needed to be read. And I fell in love with my second reading.

It sounds trite to say that Tolkien's world is rich but it is, and I am far from the first to become ensnared in Middle-earth via LotR. LotR, however, did not offer me the complexity of character that I had learned to appreciate in modern literature. I found that much more in The Silmarillion, where few characters are cut-and-dried good or evil but pretty much everyone is floundering around, trying to make the best of a shitty situation. That really appealed to me. The fact that the characters are barely sketched in made it possible to interpret them in myriad ways, drawing on my knowledge of human psychology. (I was a psych undergrad at the time.) When I discovered fan fiction, The Silmarillion practically begged for it: all of these complex characters only skeletally drawn. I found ample raw material for my own creativity.

And I found that The Silmarillion was only the surface of a very deep pool. LotR is a gateway drug that, if you're not careful, you'll find yourself before long flopped on a couch in a dim room arguing with a stranger on the Internet about how to interpret Laws and Customs among the Eldar. In addition to my creative side, The Silmarillion appealed to my intellectual side because there was not only a whole literary history underlying the creation of that particular book--meticulously documented in The History of Middle-earth series that I began to acquire despite my poverty at the time--but an entire pseudohistoriography. The result was a mashup of creativity and scholarship where the borders blurred. I was in love.

The Silmarillion and what it inspired of my creative and intellectual work has had reverberations through most of my life. When I picked it up, I had no idea what I wanted to do with my life, but I was terrified to imagine that my love of writing and creativity should be a major part of my adult life. Becoming involved in the Tolkien fandom through my love of The Silmarillion empowered me to embrace my love of language as a core of who I am. I went back to graduate school. I became a teacher. I eventually earned my MA in the Humanities and have had my scholarly work published. All because of The Silmarillion.

Through the Tolkien fandom, I have gained confidence in my skill as an artist, my voice, and the importance of my work. I have met amazing, lifelong friends whom I cannot imagine my life without. I have done things (like present at conferences) and learned things (like web design) that I never would have imagined as the young undergrad picking up The Silmarillion for the first time.

It's hard to imagine such a tiny action as picking up a book to read as having such far-ranging consequences. I still remember standing in the Barnes & Noble on The Avenue at White Marsh and holding my now-battered Silmarillion in my hands, deciding to spend my meager money to have more of this world, clueless that I had just decided to change my life. It's humbling and scary to realize that one's life is very rarely shaped by huge forces or in moments that one recognizes as turning points but in the tiniest of decisions that, looking back, set off a cascade of forces so that nothing was ever the same again. It is both frightening and hopeful to step daily into a world where that is possible.



This post was originally posted on Dreamwidth and, using my Felagundish Elf magic, crossposted to LiveJournal. You can comment here or there!

http://dawn-felagund.dreamwidth.org/402244.html
  • LotR is a gateway drug that, if you're not careful, you'll find yourself before long flopped on a couch in a dim room arguing with a stranger on the Internet about how to interpret Laws and Customs among the Eldar.

    Oh gosh, that's so true! :)

    Thank you for sharing this wonderful journey with us.
  • I think it was two, maybe three years ago that I finally made it through the Quenta. It's just so overwhelming. In a lot of ways it strikes me like the history sections of the Bible - important that it's there and definitely vital to the tradition/conversation as a whole, but most of us read it in bits and drabs, if at all.

    But there's so much content there, so many nuggets just demanding to be expanded on, aren't they? No wonder it's so influential for so many of us.
  • Out of the many Tolkien books, I think The Silmarillion is my favorite because it is a foundation book. Without that framework, The Hobbit and LOTRO would be expansive fairy-tales. With the framework, they become parts of an opus and a swim into scholarly waters that I've adored for decades.

    I'm very grateful that you managed to find yourself enthralled with The Silmarillion.

    - Erulisse (one L)
  • I have met amazing, lifelong friends whom I cannot imagine my life without.

    Absolutely. 1000%.
  • Yes, I also remember when buying my copy of The Silmarillion in the Librería Rodriguez (a very unTolkien name :D) and also typing in Maglor into the browser back in 2006 and wow! discovering fanfiction.

    one's life is very rarely shaped by huge forces or in moments that one recognizes as turning points but in the tiniest of decisions
    So true!

    I have met amazing, lifelong friends whom I cannot imagine my life without.
    Yes!
  • Heh! I fell in love with the Silmarillion right from the start, but I also only understood about a third of what was going on! Though I suspect that this sense of things passing right over my head only added to the sense of scope and wonder, and may well have contributed to my lasting fascination. (Also, I guess reading the book in a year of Important Events - I turned 18, went on a sailing trip with the scouts, to Canada with my grandmother, and to Hastings (the 1066 one) on a class trip, and worked on my driving licence - inseparably links it to a formative time in my life... and at the end of the year, The Fellowship of the Ring hit cinemas! There was no going back after that!)

    Amusingly (in hindsight), my poor battered paperback copy of the Silm also happens to be the first book I ordered online -- I wanted to have the copy that belonged to my copy of LotR, dammit, and if the bookstores I went to had any English copies at all, they were the wrong edition!. Doesn't sound like a big deal today, but OMG it felt so adventurous back then to set up an account on Amazon! And just, like, have an English language book sent to my home instead of waiting for weeks until the local bookstore had acquired it! XD

    Through the Tolkien fandom, I have gained confidence in my skill as an artist, my voice, and the importance of my work. I have met amazing, lifelong friends whom I cannot imagine my life without.

    This is true also for me!
    The flip side is that if I hadn't gotten into Tolkien at that time, I might not have decided to study English philology and Random Stuff On The Side, but something more useful. >_> Then again, I might still have studied English philology, and just have found the linguistics aspect of it more difficult... ;)

    Edited at 2017-01-04 05:38 pm (UTC)
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