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Medium Dawn Felagund of the Fountain

Yay! / Not-So-Yay

The (Cyber) Bag of Weasels

bread and puppet




"About as much fun as a bag of weasels"...when I first saw this Irish adage, it made me think of the life of a writer: sometimes perilous, sometimes painful, certainly interesting. My paper journal has always been called "The Bag of Weasels." This is the Bag of Weasels' online home.

Yay! / Not-So-Yay

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irrepressible
First of all, I would be a bad little liberal LJer if I did not point to the icon *points to icon* and encourage my fellow LJers to visit irrepressible.info to find out about Amnesty International's campaign to protect human rights and free speech on the Internet.

Did you know that people have been imprisoned in some countries for expressing peaceful views in email, chatrooms, and blogs that were contrary to what their leaders wanted us to hear?

Did you know that corporations as large as Microsoft and Yahoo! have assisted in some nations' efforts to censor content on the Internet and bring about charges against those who dare to speak freely?

satismagic has created the icon (available here) and suggested using it on posts and comments until November 2nd to spread the word about this campaign.

For those interested in reading more, Amnesty International also has a press release about the campaign.

Yesterday was completely and totally a Yay!day.

First of all, I have gotten numerous comments on my stories this week that have been absolutely wonderful. Those of you who read here know who you are, and I will be replying to give you my thanks shortly. It reminds me of how, when I first discovered Silmarillion fan fiction and read it voraciously, back in those heady days when ff.net was not filtered at work, and I would often read a story that I absolutely adored...and never comment to tell the author the way that I felt. Often, I would read the comments and see squeeing along the lines of what I was also tempted to do and think, "This is a big author who surely does not need li'l ol' me to make her feel better about her writing." Sometimes, I even suspected that authors might be annoyed by another mindless, "I absolutely loved your story and just wanted you to know that I could not stop reading it."

(Part of that, I will admit, is because when I used to participate in writers' workshops, when it was my story's turn to endure critique, a good 90% of the people would say, "I liked it!" and leave it at that. No concrit, no suggestions; most of the time, they didn't even really qualify what they'd liked about it. It used to annoy me terribly because 1) I want(ed) to improve as a writer and 2) when those authors had had their turn (and I am almost always at the end of workshops because my real last name starts with a W), I'd generally read the story twice, write in-text comments, and write a page-long analysis of the story at the end. To spend four hours on their story to get back  "I liked it!" on mine was, needless to say, annoying.)

But comments, I've found, are different than critiques or workshops. Work that I share on archives is almost always the absolute best that I can make it, given my current abilities. (Anyone who reads some of the tripe that I post here knows that my standards for LJ are significantly less stringent.) So while I appreciate concrit no matter what the "status" of my story, I don't generally wait while wringing my hands for some literary genius to happen along and fix the story that I know is broken yet don't quite have the talent yet to fix on my own. I could get 100 "I liked it!" comments and not feel annoyed.

In fact, sometimes, such comments definitely buoy me. While I've gotten more confident in my abilities, I sometimes still feel terribly inadequate as an author. (And this is not a plea for anyone to remind me that I am not; honestly, I believe that the day that I stop seeing flaws in my writing and believing it inferior to what I am capable of doing is the day that my stories will begin to truly suck.) Especially now that I'm back to struggling with o-fic, to get the occasional comment reminding me that I'm not absolute crap as a writer is certainly encouraging, even if it is a comment on my fanfic.

On a slightly related note, in addition to really nice comments left on three of my archive-published stories, I received an email from one of the authors I recently reviewed at AC proclaiming that Sharon and I are "awesome." I don't think that I've ever been called "awesome" by a near-stranger before. (Though I may have forgotten an instance where I did a wee favor for a customer at the piece--like a free cup of M&Ms or something--and got called "awesome.") It was really cool.

At AC, we offer reviews to any authors that want them (unless an author pisses off Sharon with shenanigans involving simultaneous submissions, but that's a special case). In this case, I really liked the story--though, as usual, I had a few suggestions for the author--and rated it highly in terms of publication to Sharon. The author wrote Sharon with a question he wanted to ask me (since I did not then publish my email address with my reviews), and she forwarded it, so I answered it. No biggie. But apparently, I am "awesome" for it. So cool!

But really, I know where the guy is coming from. Having sent work to magazines myself, in a time long past, it is rare to hear back from editors at all, much less with anything approximating lengthy comments. I got a single comment back on the story that I was trying to publish--one sentence--out of ten magazines that I'd sent it to. The majority didn't even bother to use my SASE to send me a rejection letter. For all I know, that story is published someplace. Not like I'd care; I'm not even willing to admit that I'd written the thing anymore! And it had been published in Bartleby when I was a university freshman; I was seeking a reprint for it in a place with wider readership.

That's one good thing about online literary magazines: It used to be that the editors had the authors backed against the wall. They could treat us however they liked; we needed them to see our name in print, and they knew it. These days, we have more options and--AC is proof of this--one does not need great funding to start a literary magazine. So authors mistreated by a particular market no longer need to feel as obligated to make nice with them just to keep their doors open. There are a lot of doors now, and many smaller markets like AC make treating authors well part of their publication's philosophy.

It's also a lot harder to justify a slow response now that we have email just as--from the editor's PoV--it is harder for authors to justify not following guidelines now that many magazines have the guidelines on the Internet. It used to be that, sometimes, you had to send away for them. On a college budget, querying twenty magazines for guidelines with postage 39 cents and an SASE required, this is problematic. Especially when you find out that half of them have a maximum word count of 2500 and your story is 6000. Trust me; I've been there.

Anyway, my point is that lots of people made the 'gund feel very happy this week about her contributions both as an author and as an editor. Especially on the last, it is easy to feel like the bad guy, so to make an author happy is really nice.

Last night, our families came over and we went out to dinner and to stroll around Historic Savage Mill, which is the old renovated textile mill where Bobby and I did a ghost tour two weeks ago. We haven't seen our families since my birthday more than a month ago, so it was really nice. We went to Ram's Head Tavern for supper, and it was excellent, as always. Savage Mill has a really unique clothing store that definitely sells what one might call 'gund-type clothes--sparkly things; shirts that lace up; long, full skirts--and my mom, mother-in-law, sister-in-law Erin, and I spent a good half-hour and entirely too much money in there. I haven't had new clothes in years, so I'm trying to buy some new stuff that actually fits. Then my dad insisted on paying for my stuff, which was really, really nice. So I have a gorgeous black satiny skirt with sparkly trim, a brown tunic top that laces up with satin ribbon, and a red sparkly shirt set to wear with the black skirt.

As for not-so-yay news, Bobby has been fighting off a cold for the last week...and I've officially caught it from him. And just as I was feeling proud of having avoided it, too! The scratchy throat started last night after everyone left, so I took NyQuil and went to bed fairly early, since I had to be up at seven for aquarist-assistant training. That went well but wasn't as enjoyable as last week's. For one, I was sick, and touring the hot and humid Amazon Rainforest and Australia exhibits was not a happy affair, at eight-thirty in the morning, with my blood-sugar low and not feeling well to boot. Also, the lectures this week were aimed more at the guides than the behind-the-scenes staff. A lot of it pertained to techniques on how to engage the public in discussions, and I'm sitting--feeling miserable--and thinking, "I'm not even going to see the public! What do I care? Can I go home now and have my nap?" Also, I gleaned that there were complaints that last week's lesson had been too intense, and I don't know if this week's was toned down as a result, but it certainly felt like it. At the risk of sounding snobby, this has always annoyed me. It would often be that way in school too: *cue whining* "Oh, this is too hard; can't we have more time?" It's always a pity when people are expected to rub their two brain cells together hard enough to learn something or understand how to do their jobs. The material wasn't even that advanced, and I haven't had an ecology class in six years and a zoology class in seven.

So it was interesting but didn't excite me to learn more the way that last week's lectures did. This week felt like the material that you'd spew to the public and--at risk of sounding snobby again--I really think that we as employees there should know more than that. At least, I want to.

But...we're more than halfway finished now! Then we complete three apprenticeships with our aquarist and will be working on our own!

I have a research project to do for next week, and I think I'm going to research jellyfish. I've always liked the Cnidarians; it's a cool phylum. And I have a few neat ideas of what to do with the project too.

Wow, that post turned out much longer than I'd intended. Oops. Well, now it's off to dinner.... *wanders off dreaming of quality Mexican food*
  • Hubby and I had a nice discussion this afternoon about privacy, the internet, commercial companies wanting private info and such (two information professionals together, always interesting). We discussed LJ and Six Apart at length, their current move to place all Russian users under Russian control and we all know how that works. I am not surprised by MSN or Yahoodeladoki anymore, I love IRC. And you wonder why I don't give much away about my personal life. But for you guys, with the Habeas Corpus killed it gets downward scary.

    As for reviews, well I am happy you got so many! I learnt long ago that receiving scarce reviews should not let an author stop writing, so if it wasn't for my beta's mostly and some good & close friends, I might have quit if that was the barometer for your stuff. But then as we were tucking in our wee!one, hubby glanced over his shoulder while chatting to Kev and said.. "and maybe soon mommy is a novel writer and will she also starts to write the big adventures of Mr Mouse." My heart fluttered to get such praise, especially from him. So I take it where I can get it and enjoy writing my lovely and (sometimes big) plotbunnies. Get better soon hon, sending you healthy vibes!
    • "and maybe soon mommy is a novel writer and will she also starts to write the big adventures of Mr Mouse."

      What a sweet compliment!

      That's really great. :-)
    • Yeah, I was bitching a little bit to Tarion about--of all stupid things--American football and how the officials often "cheat" for certain teams, then I realized that such a stupid little thing that doesn't mean diddly-squat in the long run really just illustrates how I feel about life in general right now.

      But we're coming up upon election time, and Those Who Know are predicting a regime change, so maybe things will get better. I hope.

      As for reviews, well I am happy you got so many!

      I got really nice, long reviews from three people on three stories...and one of them was you! So thank you very much for that; I will hopefully be able to reply properly today, since I'm stuck home on the couch, sick. :^P

      It's always wonderful when your husband supports your writing! Bobby's support of mine has really made such a huge difference. I'd imagine that it's not always easy to live with a writer (like when he asks me something and I stare at him for ten seconds while my brain comes back from Valinor or the Midhavens--wherever it was that day--before answering :^P).

      I have a feeling that for many on my flist, I will be buying your books someday. ;)
      • But we're coming up upon election time, and Those Who Know are predicting a regime change, so maybe things will get better. I hope.

        Yeah me 2. :c)

        Hubby fully supports original fic yeah, fanfic: no. Even today when I was talking to Kyra and when I told her I would quit volunteering to make more time for my friends he started to comment to me that I need to do that. He's fed up with it to put it mildly. So I don't know how much I will be withdrawing.

        I'd imagine that it's not always easy to live with a writer (like when he asks me something and I stare at him for ten seconds while my brain comes back from Valinor or the Midhavens--wherever it was that day--before answering :^P).

        LOL yes, but then he can be the same too when he's watching tv or just has watched some anime. Or I scare the bejezus out of him when he's doing something in his pc room. ;)

        I have a feeling that for many on my flist, I will be buying your books someday. ;)

        I started on the real research today and gathered 221 pages of first references which I need to sort out. I spotted some books I have myself, so yay. I also decided on a short kinda horror fic like which I will be submitting this spring to a writing competition. I gave my last submission to that competition (in 2005) to my friend Erin to read this evening (she can read German and both languages are fairly close), so she started to encouraged me to expand on that fantasy story too to work it into a novel.

        I know at least that my mom wants to see my works published. If there is one thing about inheriting things, I got the love for books from her, the love for history from my father and she's thrilled to see that I am combining both. So I feel very blessed.
        • I'm going to be cutting back on writing fanfic next year too. Not eliminating it--I plan to start the "prequel" novel to AMC in December/January--but I won't be writing two or three stories a month. I'm going to turn my attention to getting the SWG site going and publishing my o-fic. I'll probably be joining a speculative fiction workshop. So I can relate to reaching a point and realizing that it's time to cut back a bit. :)

          Bobby's always been surprisingly supportive of even my fanfic. But I think he realizes its importance to me as a person and a writer: I probably would not even be seriously considering publishing my writing--or even writing at all--if not for "rediscovering" my love of writing through fanfic. And in a community where it's hard to get decent feedback on o-fic, I've had no shortage of that on my fanfic and grown as a writer--not just a fanfic writer--thanks to the help of my kind reviewers. (And you're right at the top of that list! *hugs*)

          As a person, it keeps me sane. Writing for publication can be tiring and it's easy to forget why I really write, which is not to get into magazines. :^P So fanfic keeps me on track.

          Best of luck to you with your research and your novel!
  • Comments can definitely buoy and cheer you up. I haven't received a lot of feedback in months, then suddenly, when I was feeling bad, someone discovered my writing and sent me a few long, careful comments, that really meant the world to me on that day.

    Online privacy... while being circumspect, I don't believe in hysterics. Or as my old law professor used to say "And when the time comes to hang for these freedoms, then I will hang, and I hope that you, ladies and gentlemen, will hang with me."

    I'll hang. I dare say I won't enjoy it, but I think I'll only bend that far. I hope. (May that day never come.)

    I hope you are feeling better soon. Look at HA to get cheered up, Tolkien fanfic in six words *should* do the trick.

    (P.S.: Blame frenchpony for that.)
    • Especially since I've been wrestling with o-fic again, being reminded, "Dawn, you're not a completely crappy writer!" is always appreciated. ;)

      I like to think that I'd hang for certain rights too. Really, reading your post about this wasn't a surprise to me. I suppose that I'd always expected that it was only a matter of time before the "wrong" people realized the enormous power of the Internet and sought to control it. I just hope that AI can manage some positive change in that regard.

      But I think it says something too when I can read about the loss of human rights on some massive scale and think, "*shrug* That really fails to surprise me."
  • Well, you got sick of course, because you were feeling proud that you hadn't caught Bobby's cold! Kind of like how I walked carefully to class when it snowed a few weeks ago, making sure not to slip on the ice (especially since I was thinking, "Let's NOT totally f*ck up the ankle more.") and I was right in front of my building when I totally ate it in front of two random people. It was really embarassig. ;P

    That clothing store sounds like a good place for getting clothes for my costume - goth vampire, or something like that. :) For a moment this evening, I was all excited because I have knee-high black boots...but then I realized that they are at home. Dang.

    Usually, my lazy-@$$ self loves "more time" or "toned down" stuff, but I know what you mean. There's definitely a not-challenging-enough level. Actually, it's why I quit band here. My section leader even asked, "We're going to slow for you, aren't we?" I was like, "Well, yes..." and had no idea how to explain in diplomatic terms that my old band could totally pwn them and that I could out-march practically everyone and out-play most - when I hadn't played ALL SUMMER!! So I did the cop-thing and had a breakdown and blathered about some crap about how I couldn't handle more and that the last four years had been enough, thanks. I just left out the why I couldn't handle it (because it would've sounded really snotty to say, "I just can't handle this because...because I'M BETTER THAN YOU ALL!!!!!! Waaaaah!")

    Quality Mexican food? Maybe *you* could come down to Tejas for New Year's instead! ;)
    • Well, you got sick of course, because you were feeling proud that you hadn't caught Bobby's cold!

      I know. The perils of pride. ;)

      That clothing store sounds like a good place for getting clothes for my costume - goth vampire, or something like that.

      They don't have too much in plain black, though, so you'd be a glittery, colorful vampire. ;) My skirt is black but has red embroidery and silver sequins all along the top. It sounds kind of gaudy when I put it that way; it really is pretty. Incidentally, I wore the brown lace-up top last night with my red cloak, and people openly stared. I suppose that they thought I was wearing my Halloween costume. :^P The other night, Bobby and I went for a late meal after his game, and a woman asked me if I was coming from the Ren Fest. Since she was coming from there herself (in costume) I was far from insulted. I told her, "Nope, these are actually my daily-use clothes," and we both laughed.

      I just left out the why I couldn't handle it (because it would've sounded really snotty to say, "I just can't handle this because...because I'M BETTER THAN YOU ALL!!!!!! Waaaaah!")

      Yeah, I went there with skating too, at White Marsh. When we would spend fifteen minutes on sit spins...ai. I've been doing sit spins for ten years now.

      It annoys me the most in academic settings. Which I suppose one shrewd enough would argue that the Aquarium is not an academic setting, but I really want to know everything I need to know before I start taking care of animals that millions of people pay money to see every year, and I'm baffled why others don't want to do the same, especially when they also gave us a binder full of summaries on each topic and four weeks to study before the exam.

      In school, it was always one or two kiss-asses that whined. To dredge up some of my oldest sour grapes, when time came for senior awards at my high school, the English Award went to this girl who spent every AP English class whining about how having to read a book, write an essay, and do a project all at the same time was too much work. *cue world's smallest violin* But she was the "editor" of the school's typo-ridden and shallow piece-of-crap newspaper, so she was a shoo-in.

      I got a runner-up award; since I wasn't expecting an award at all, this was an honor and a surprise. I had done my AP work without complaint and received two awards for my fiction, but I guess that just wasn't comparable to someone with the skill to mangle (literally) every sentence in a newspaper article in some grave mechanical way.

      So, since then, I have borne unusual resentment towards those people. Though the girl I mentioned got hers in the end: She failed out of University of Maryland in one semester and ended up working at Ruby Tuesday's. Guess her ass-kissing and whining didn't work in a class of 300 students and a professor who didn't care. ;)
      • Eh, sequins could work. Or red. My friend and I are going to go shopping tonight or tomorrow to see if we can find anything cool this late in the game. (And for cheap.) Everyone seems to have a cloak. I wants. My roommate has one too - total unfairness! I pretty much own only t-shirts and jeans! :P

        I really want to know everything I need to know before I start taking care of animals that millions of people pay money to see every year, and I'm baffled why others don't want to do the same

        Yes especially since no one forced them to do this. Although, if the guides and AqAsst (right?) train together, I can sort of see where that sort of public relations crap would be handy for them. Doesn't mean it's less boring though.

        To dredge up some of my oldest sour grapes, when time came for senior awards at my high school, the English Award went to this girl who spent every AP English class whining about how having to read a book, write an essay, and do a project all at the same time was too much work. *cue world's smallest violin*

        Heh. I don't even remember who got the English award. Not me. *shrug* I got some award for "exhibiting leadership and outstanding achievement in both academics and music" or some such thing.

        I loved my AP English classes. I can't remember much true complaining, not by any one person. Of course, when you're in a "G/T" program, you color pictures, so you don't have a reason to complain! ;P

        Guess her ass-kissing and whining didn't work in a class of 300 students and a professor who didn't care. ;)

        Or a class of 300 with a professor who did care, but could see she was just a whiny brat, like my super cool genetics professor. :)
        • You got to color in G/T classes? Lucky you! Our AP English class literally did have us reading a book/play, writing an essay on another book/play, and completing a project on a third book/play at any given time during the year. It was a hard class...but most of my G/T classes were hard. When I got to college, it was actually a bit of a relief. :^P

          Behind-the-scenes staff (i.e., aquarist assistants, herpetology assistants, horticulture assistants) do train with the front-of-the-house staff (i.e., exhibit guides). I think that's going to be my only suggestion when they ask us for feedback: We really should be trained separately. They don't need the technical detail that we require, and we don't need to discuss the advantages of hunkering down to talk to children or point out animals at the bottoms of the tanks. From what I've heard, most of the complaints center around one group being made to listen to and learn the other group's material. I'd bet that few of the complaints about the intense first week came from the behind-the-scenes people, and none of the annoyance this week will come from the exhibit guides.

          The restaurant rule applies here, I guess: front- and back-of-the-house are completely different worlds and should be treated accordingly. :^P
          • No no...We had two different sections. G/T AP and regular AP. G/T was for "creative people" or something. So we still wrote essays and took the test and all that crap. But we also did random crap too, like make movies and draw pictures. ;) I wouldn't call it hard though...at least, I never had a rough time with it.
            • Ah...gotcha!

              The Baltimore County system had three levels: standard, honors, and G/T. In junior or senior year, certain G/T classes became AP classes, so the terms were synonymous. That's why I boggled a bit; I think that the only coloring I did in high school was during the fetal pig dissection in 10th grade bio. I was a conscientious objector, so I got to color anatomy pictures instead. Yay!

              G/T classes varied on how difficult they were, but I can say that the three APs I decided to take were very difficult: bio, English, and calc 1 & 2. Calc was, surprisingly, the easiest class, though I did poorest on that exam. (A 3, whereas the other two were 5s.) English was probably the hardest because of the workload, which was pretty extreme. Though I was grateful come college when everyone else was overwhelmed, and to me, it was just more of what I'd had for the past four years!
              • Our G/T only applied to English, for whatever reason. Everything else was termed "honors" or "pre-AP" in high school. I guess "Creative AP English" might be a better name, but...It was nice, because some assignments were essays and analyses in preparation for the AP test, but then we had mre fun and creative assignments too.

                I took four AP classes: double English (language and literature), calc 1&2 (or, as we called it at least, BC), and spanish. Calc was probably the hardest class, but they were all about equal. I ended up with three 4's and a 5.

                I absolutely suck at those AP multiple choice questions, because I totally over-analyze things, or analyze them in new and creative ways ;P. The writing, I'm convinced, saved me. Though funnily enough, basically every single G/T student got a 0/4 on the state standardized writing test - lol!! We must have been smarter than the graders, and were probably the only students who answered the question exactly as stated (which usually said "use evidence" - which apparently meant "do not actually use evidence from the text" o.O). Yay standardized tests!
                • I'm still proud of my AP English score...one of my essays was written on a play that I'd never read. :^P I guess that's proof that having a vague idea what something's about and having a flare for writing can fool nearly anyone!

                  Standardized tests are stupid. Whenever I think of standardized tests, I think of the weeks in 8th-grade science spent learning how to read topographical maps because that had been on the prior year's MSPAP. But guess what? It wasn't on that year's...though it's been a helpful skill to have while reading trail maps.
                  • I guess that's proof that having a vague idea what something's about and having a flare for writing can fool nearly anyone!

                    I agree! I think I got really high scores on the writing, as I said, and totally f*cked the multiple choice section. I have no idea what I wrote about for any of the six essays...Not a clue. Though this also means that once upon a time I was actually able to write three essays in two hours!

                    Whenever I think of standardized tests, I think of the weeks in 8th-grade science spent learning how to read topographical maps because that had been on the prior year's MSPAP.

                    The opposite actually happened to me in calculus, else I might have managed to pull a 5...

                    Standardized tests make me think of how there was always a question on the science section which read, "Which of these is alive? a) star b) pencil c) tree d) log" I am not even kidding...
                    • Wow. That this is even thought to be a question worth asking really says something about the state of US science education. Of course, as a Marylander and a vegetarian, the question I get asked the most often is "So, do you eat steamed crabs?" And I say no and point out that I define "vegetarian" as not consuming any animals. 9 times out of 10, this meets with a blank look and, "But crabs aren't animals."

                      So they are...plants? Fungi? Monera? Protists? Argh. It boggles me how people can drift through life so foolishly naive.

                      Here I go getting snobby again....
  • Did you know that people have been imprisoned in some countries for expressing peaceful views in email, chatrooms, and blogs that were contrary to what their leaders wanted us to hear?

    Did you know that corporations as large as Microsoft and Yahoo! have assisted in some nations' efforts to censor content on the Internet and bring about charges against those who dare to speak freely?


    Yes and yes. This happened in my country. A man called Shi Tao got a ten-year jail sentence because Yahoo gave "evidence" to the authorities. I deleted my Yahoo account the very same day I found out.

    Even now, I cannot access a number of sites without special software, because a firewall (called the Golden Shield by those few who know about it in China and the Great Firewall everywhere else) blocks them. These sites include Amnesty International, Wikipedia, and Google's caches. So yes, I know, and I've ranted about it more than once.
    • I knew that you would know. Actually, I think that the incident you mentioned was in the press release that I linked. If not that...something very similar. Needless to say, China was mentioned several times, and I thought of you for each. :^/

      I remember too when you were trying to download BBM and thinking, "I'm worried about *insert petty thing of the moment* and some of my online friends deal every day with open censorship."

      I aimed the first part of this post at the majority of people in my own country, who think that the luxuries and rights that we have--eroded as they have become under the oh-so-fine leadership of George W. Bush--are enjoyed everywhere. They're not.

      But you, of course, know this. ;)

      I deleted my Yahoo account the very same day I found out.

      Ah, and I've been meaning to ask you if you knew that your SWG mail has been bouncing again. I've got my answer. ;)
  • I could get 100 "I liked it!" comments and not feel annoyed.

    Seconded. After two years in Silm fandom I still love getting reviews like that, and those of the long and rambly kind still tend to make me squee and literally jump up and down. :)

    BTW, I'll now seize the opportunity to thank you for the lovely review you left at the MEFA site for 'Nothing But Dreams'. I actually wanted to answer you per e-mail for sooo long, but kept forgetting. :)

    And that shop sounds wonderful. Last week I've actually seen a shiny golden-brown brocade-looking lace-up corsage style top in a store that was completely *wantwantwant*. Unfortunately, though, my bank account told me *nonono*. ;) And I absolutely love full-length skirts, even though I have to admit they were one of the things I picked up after they became a common trend. Before, I thought I couldn't wear them because I'm so short. Then, last summer, I gave it a try and got so many compliments for it that I stuck with it. ;)
    • You're very welcome! The story was absolutely beautiful! :)

      I've always been fond of long skirts. They allow me flop around without fear of showing my knickers (or getting hung up in my knickers after using the lavatory :^P), keep my legs warm in chilly weather, and mean that I don't have to shave so often. :^P Ah, being married is lovely in that regard too!

      Somehow, I've never pictured you as short, though, before....
      • Oh, I've recognized the shaving thing. Very practical indeed. ;)

        Somehow, I've never pictured you as short, though, before....

        Yay, I'm virtually tall! ;) Though I'm not really extremely short I have to say (about 5"2' or 3'). Only shorter than many others, including my little sister. :)
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